Programming

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Thursday, February 27
6 – 8 p.m.

Join us for a public screening of The Pollinators at Harbor Theater in Boothbay Harbor on Thursday, February 27 at 6 p.m. (Doors open at 5 p.m.) Appetizers, concessions, and a cash bar will be available prior to the screening.

Per director Peter Nelson, The Pollinators is “a cinematic journey around the United States following migratory beekeepers and their truckloads of honey bees as they pollinate the flowers that become the fruits, nuts and vegetables we all eat.” This film focuses not only on these vital pollinators, but also on the beekeepers, farmers, chefs, and academics who interact with them, offering the audience a broader perspective about honey bees’ importance and the threats to both their survival and our food security.

As a special addition to the evening, CMBG’s CFO/COO and Master Beekeeper, Erin MacGregor-Forbes, will give a brief introduction prior to the film—along with a little buzz about our next season’s new learning apiary. Erin MacGregor-Forbes is former Chairman of the Eastern Apicultural Society, the largest noncommercial beekeeping organization in the United States.
with Daniel Ungier and Irene Barber
Friday, April 17
10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Our Certificate in Native Plants and Ecological Horticulture program offers a broad introduction to a sustainable, New England-focused approach to gardening and landscape design. To work toward certification, enrolled students take 11 core courses and three electives. Enrollment is ensured upon signing up for the spring orientation session. To learn more about this program and its curriculum, see our Certificate Programs page for details.
with Erika Huber
Friday, April 24
10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Join us for an exploratory program designed for homeschool families. Each session will focus on a different garden- or nature-based science lesson. Students will also help plant a spring garden and start seeds in our greenhouse. Each session will include a short break and a project to take home.
The Life of a Plant- Students will discover how plants survive as we discuss plant needs, processes, adaptations, and experiment in our greenhouse. We will take a garden walk and learn to identify some of our early spring blooms.
Topics covered: Life cycle, plant parts, germination, photosynthesis, dormancy, and annual vs. perennial.


with Erika Huber
Fridays - April 24, May 8 & 22, June 5 & 19
9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Join us for an exploratory program designed for homeschool families. Each session will focus on a different garden- or nature-based science lesson. Students will also help plant a spring garden and start seeds in our greenhouse. Each session will include a short break and a project to take home.


April 24-The Life of a Plant- Students will discover how plants survive as we discuss plant needs, processes, adaptations, and experiment in our greenhouse. We will take a garden walk and learn to identify some of our early spring blooms.
Topics covered: Life cycle, plant parts, germination, photosynthesis, dormancy, and annual vs. perennial.


May 8-Wetland Wonders-Students will explore our many vernal pools and ponds in search of egg masses, frogs, salamanders, and aquatic insects while gaining an understanding of the important role wetlands play in nature.
Topics covered: Amphibians vs. reptiles, life cycles, vernal pools, food chains, and wetland types.


May 22-Life Underground-Students will closely examine the creatures living underground in the garden, examine the anatomy of a worm, and learn about the importance of soil-dwelling critters.
Topics covered: Decomposers, macroinvertebrates, arthropods, compost, and the soil food web.


June 5- Wildflower Walk-Using basic botany skills, students will learn to identify Maine wildflowers as we venture into the “wilder” parts of our property. To aid in identification, we’ll also dissect a flower to understand its parts.
Topics covered: Flower anatomy, identifying characteristics of plants, and native wildflower identification.


June 19-Bees- To learn about honeybee colonies and the amazing ways bees communicate, students will join our beekeeper in CMBG’s apiary. We’ll discuss the process of pollination as we learn about the special relationship between flowers and their pollinators. We’ll also harvest spring crops from the garden.


Topics covered: Pollination, native bees, bee communication, flower anatomy, conservation of bees.

with Dr. Lois Berg Stack
Tuesday and Wednesday, April 28 and 29
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

In this class for the ecologically-minded grower, learn the basic properties and functions of soil. A fundamental understanding of soil science is critical in selecting well-adapted native plants or in choosing amendments to mimic the natural conditions needed by various native plant communities. Students will gain an understanding of soil texture, chemistry, water-holding capacity, and why these factors affect a plant’s health.
with Erika Huber
Friday, May 8
10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Join us for an exploratory program designed for homeschool families. Each session will focus on a different garden- or nature-based science lesson. Students will also help plant a spring garden and start seeds in our greenhouse. Each session will include a short break and a project to take home.
Wetland Wonders-Students will explore our many vernal pools and ponds in search of egg masses, frogs, salamanders, and aquatic insects while gaining an understanding of the important role wetlands play in nature.
Topics covered: Amphibians vs. reptiles, life cycles, vernal pools, food chains, and wetland types.
with Irene Brady Barber
Wednesday and Thursday, May 13 and 14
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Our landscape practices affect the balance of our ecosystem both above and below the soil and in the quality of our waters. In this intensive two-day course, learn how to apply ecologically safe horticulture practices to existing landscapes and garden beds. Topics covered will include methods of composting, eco-friendly soil amendments, locally derived organic landscaping materials, plant forms for function, alternatives to pesticides and herbicides, responsible acquisition of native plants, and other low-impact sustainable horticultural practices.

This course is part of the Certificate in Native Plants and Ecological Horticulture program but is open to all, subject to availability.
Tuesday, May 19
4 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Kitchen Garden Café

Enjoy our annual display of thousands of tulips followed by a traditional English Cream Tea. Enjoy your own individual pot of tea with your choice of milk or lemon, accompanied by delicate tea sandwiches and freshly baked scones made that morning by Mollie and Wells Moore. Top your homemade scones with Mollie’s own strawberry jam and real clotted cream. Make reservations early as seating is limited.
with Erika Huber
Friday, May 22
10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Join us for an exploratory program designed for homeschool families. Each session will focus on a different garden- or nature-based science lesson. Students will also help plant a spring garden and start seeds in our greenhouse. Each session will include a short break and a project to take home.
Life Underground-Students will closely examine the creatures living underground in the garden, examine the anatomy of a worm, and learn about the importance of soil-dwelling critters.
Topics covered: Decomposers, macroinvertebrates, arthropods, compost, and the soil food web.
with Dan Robarts
Thursday, May 28 and Tuesday, July 28
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Over two days—once in the spring and later in summer—native plant expert Dan Robarts will introduce students to native plants for use in different horticultural settings based on their habitat preferences. Plant selections for different combinations of soil pH, sun and shade, and wet and dry substrate will be considered, as will selecting plants for color and texture, their broader ecosystem considerations, application in niche garden communities, and their role in ecological restoration.

While this is a core course in the Certificate in Native Plants and Ecological Horticulture program, it is open to everyone, subject to availability.
with Erika Huber
Friday, June 5
10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Join us for an exploratory program designed for homeschool families. Each session will focus on a different garden- or nature-based science lesson. Students will also help plant a spring garden and start seeds in our greenhouse. Each session will include a short break and a project to take home.
Wildflower Walk-Using basic botany skills, students will learn to identify Maine wildflowers as we venture into the “wilder” parts of our property. To aid in identification, we’ll also dissect a flower to understand its parts.
Topics covered: Flower anatomy, identifying characteristics of plants, and native wildflower identification.
with Dr.Lois Berg Stack
Wednesday and Thursday, June 10 and 11
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Learn the core concepts of plant biology to help ground your appreciation for working with nature. We’ll cover the basic parts of a plant and how they work together to sustain the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and water and mineral uptake. We’ll follow a flowering plant through its life cycle, from germination and seedling establishment to flowering, fruiting, and seed dispersal. Through explorations in the Gardens and in the classroom, students will gain a new perspective on what goes on during the course of a plant’s life.
with Erika Huber
Friday, June 19
10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Join us for an exploratory program designed for homeschool families. Each session will focus on a different garden- or nature-based science lesson. Students will also help plant a spring garden and start seeds in our greenhouse. Each session will include a short break and a project to take home.
Bees- To learn about honeybee colonies and the amazing ways bees communicate, students will join our beekeeper in CMBG’s apiary. We’ll discuss the process of pollination as we learn about the special relationship between flowers and their pollinators. We’ll also harvest spring crops from the garden.
Topics covered: Pollination, native bees, bee communication, flower anatomy, conservation of bees.

with Hillary Parker
Monday - Friday, June 29 - July 3
9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Naturalist and internationally award-winning botanical watercolor artist Hillary Parker returns this summer to teach two week-long, theme-based Nature Illustration Camps (see themes below). Participants will develop a strong foundation in observation, drawing, and painting skills using pencil, pen and ink, colored pencil, and watercolors. Each week ends with a gallery-style reception for family and friends. All art supplies are included with tuition.

Young artists will study and explore the many pond habitats at the Gardens. Close observation of animal life in and around a pond using catch-and-release techniques will help campers see frogs, fish, turtles, dragonflies, salamanders, and aquatic bugs in a whole new light. By the end of the week, students will have a portfolio of drawings and paintings based on daily discoveries.
with Hillary Parker
Monday-Friday, July 6 - 10
9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Naturalist and internationally award-winning botanical watercolor artist Hillary Parker returns this summer to teach two week-long, theme-based Nature Illustration Camps (see themes below). Participants will develop a strong foundation in observation, drawing, and painting skills using pencil, pen and ink, colored pencil, and watercolors. Each week ends with a gallery-style reception for family and friends. All art supplies are included with tuition.

Back by popular demand, this exciting art camp is for kids interested in developing art and cooking skills while having fun working in a studio, outdoors in the Gardens, and in the kitchen. Students will sketch, harvest fruits and veggies, and prepare recipes to snack on each day as they illustrate their own cookbook.
with Karen Jones
Monday - Friday, July 13-17
9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

From bogs and marshes to our lively ponds, campers will spend the week catching frogs and water bugs, turning over rocks and logs in search of salamanders, looking for insects trapped inside carnivorous plants, and learning more about these exciting, diverse habitats.
with Kira Hill
Monday - Friday, July 13 - 17, July 27 - 31, August 10 - 14
1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Does your child want extra time after camp to explore the Children’s Garden, build a fairy house, or go on a hike? Does a later pick-up time work better for you? In this new offering, campers will have the opportunity to spend an extra two hours exploring, playing, and discovering after the regular camp day ends. Activities will include games, crafts, puppet shows, and lots of nature discovery in our gardens and beyond.
with Karen Jones
Monday - Friday, July 20-24
9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

From bogs and marshes to our lively ponds, campers will spend the week catching frogs and water bugs, turning over rocks and logs in search of salamanders, looking for insects trapped inside carnivorous plants, and learning more about these exciting, diverse habitats.
with Kira Hill
Monday - Friday, July 20 - 24, August 3 - 7
1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Does your child want extra time after camp to explore the Children’s Garden, build a fairy house, or go on a hike? Does a later pick-up time work better for you? In this new offering, campers will have the opportunity to spend an extra two hours exploring, playing, and discovering after the regular camp day ends. Activities will include games, crafts, puppet shows, and lots of nature discovery in our gardens and beyond.
with Doug Tallamy
Tuesday, July 21
9:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Habitat loss is the primary cause of declining wildlife populations. In this class, learn why gardening for wildlife is as important as it is rewarding. Join biologist Doug Tallamy as he explains how, by incorporating native plants and gardening practices into your own landscape, to create a welcoming habitat that attracts wildlife, conserves natural resources, and encourages biodiversity. Both in-classroom instruction and forays into the Gardens will illustrate how to create a lively (and lived-in) garden habitat.

While this is a core class for the Certificate in Native Plants and Ecological Horticulture program, it is open to everyone, subject to availability.
with Ted Elliman
Thursday and Friday, July 23 and 24
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

For a comprehensive understanding of Maine’s native plants, we must understand how native plants behave in their natural habitats. In this two-day introduction to the natural communities of Maine, ecologist Ted Elliman will acquaint students with several of Maine’s characteristic plant communities, their defining physical environments, and the natural processes affecting them. In both the classroom and the field, learn the differences between community types such as salt marshes, red maple swamps, bogs, and floodplain forests. Discover common plants occurring in these communities as well as key plant adaptations for competing successfully in each.
with Karen Jones
Monday - Friday, July 27 - 31
9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Through games, activities, and observations, campers will spend the week getting up-close-and-personal with the amazing pollinators that make our gardens possible. We’ll also visit our Native Butterfly and Moth House, new observation beehive, and join Sam Jaffe and The Caterpillar Lab to learn the ins and outs of pollination. Each day will focus on a different pollinator and their unique adaptations.
with Karen Jones
Monday - Friday, August 3 - 7
9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Through games, activities, and observations, campers will spend the week getting up-close-and-personal with the amazing pollinators that make our gardens possible. We’ll also visit our Native Butterfly and Moth House, new observation beehive, and join Sam Jaffe and The Caterpillar Lab to learn the ins and outs of pollination. Each day will focus on a different pollinator and their unique adaptations.
with Melissa Cullina
Tuesday - Thursday, August 18 - 20
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Interested in gardening with Maine’s native plants? Come meet them in their wild habitats. During this intensive, three-day course with Gardens’ Research Botanist, Melissa Cullina, learn how to recognize at least 50 frequent coastal Maine plant species. Begin with an introduction to basic plant identification skills, terminology, and botanical names, then experience guided forays through the Gardens’ grounds and around the region.
with Dan Robarts
Wednesday and Thursday, September 2 and 3
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Explore the ways in which plants interact with their garden environment. Join instructor Dan Robarts as he covers topics like specific adaptations to environmental conditions; interrelationships between garden plants and their surrounding biotic and abiotic influences; and concepts such as competition, symbiosis, parasitism, pollination, and dispersal.

While this is a core course in the Certificate in Native Plants and Ecological Horticulture program, it is open to everyone, subject to availability.
with Lisa Cowan and Irene Barber
Wednesday-Friday, September 30 - October 2
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Focusing on landscape design inspired by—and inclusive of—nature, landscape architect Lisa Cowan will introduce essential design principles through the lens of natural systems. Landscape designer and horticulturist Irene Barber will help students identify and incorporate the components of an ecological landscape design. Students will examine naturally occurring systems that influence design decisions, practice environmental site analysis, and design conceptual plot plans for a selected site. Instruction will take place both in the classroom and in the Gardens’ grounds.

While this is a core course in the Certificate in Native Plants and Ecological Horticulture program, it is open to everyone, subject to availability.

We encourage students to consider taking our spring elective course, Basics of Garden Design, prior to this course.
with Ted Elliman
Wednesday and Thursday, October 7 and 8
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Bosarge Education Center

Join ecologist Ted Elliman to find out why invasive plant species get such bad lip service from botany, ecology, horticulture, and conservation professionals. In this two-day course, learn the basic ecological problems surrounding these aggressive, tenacious plants, the complicated (and sometimes political) issues surrounding invasive plant species, and the process by which a plant becomes labeled “invasive.” Finally, through images, specimens, and short local field visits, students will meet some of New England’s most common invasive species.